Titine Joyce - Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage - Scituate



Posted by Titine Joyce on 2/21/2019

You've spent plenty of time vacationing in warmer weather, so you should be prepared to move from New England to Florida, right? Maybe. But just in case there are things youíve forgotten, hereís a quick list of moving tips to ease your way into that sunshine state.

  • Separate Your Clothes: When youíre packing up, you're entire life to move across the country, a bit of organization is in order. Odds are those winter coats and boots will rarely see the light of day in warmer climates, so ease your way by packing them separately. When you organize your clothes by season during packing, you can ease the move in by pre-allocating certain items for seasonal storage. This arrangement also lets you determine just how prepared you are for yearlong heat, humidity, and rain. Worse than not finding your warm weather clothing is having none at all.
  • Bring the Sunscreen: Moving closer to the equator or just into a sunnier climate increases your chance of harmful sun exposure. Examples include anything from minor sunburns to blisters and heat exhaustion depending on your skin type and heat exposure. Be prepared by making sure you get plenty of shade and use correctly applied sunscreen for protection. Invest in hats and umbrellas to broaden your sun protection and slowly increase your exposure from day to day to build up your tan.
  • Drink Plenty of Water: Increased heat and humidity lead to increased sweating. Don't worry; everyone will be in the same condition. The only way to replace that vital liquid is to drink plenty of water. Stay away from high caffeine and sugary drinks in lieu of herbal teas and light vegetable waters if you need flavor. Still not satisfied? Try the flavored fizzy water now gracing every shelf. The bubbles don't stop it from hydrating you.
  • Remember to Bring a Sweater: This is one of those tips that sounds illogical, but wait. When its eighty plus degrees outside most of the year, everyone has air conditioning, and its always on. That means you're constantly going from ninety to seventy to eighty-five to sixty-five degrees throughout the day. Those drastic temperature drops feel great at first, but after a while, they get quite chilly. It's best always to keep a light sweater, hoodie or wrap nearby to combat that chill. Even better, when you go outside a lightweight jacket or shirt with sleeves can help protect your skin from the sun.
  • Keep an ice chest in your vehicle: In many climates, all thatís required to protect your groceries is the shade from your trunk. They might even be safe on your back seat, especially in cold weather. In the heat and humidity, everything changes. Vegetables will wilt, milk will curdle and all during your drive back from the market. If you have to make a second stop, you can lose it all. Most grocery stores in hot climates will hand out free bags of ice with your purchase. Even fast food restaurants often sell bags of ice, so you can stop in and refresh if you have a long drive. Just put the free ice and the groceries into your ice chest and continue with your errands, heat problem solved. 

When youíre relocating to a drastically different climate, be sure to check with your real estate agent about different property needs and tips to make your move easier.




Categories: Uncategorized  


Posted by Titine Joyce on 1/3/2019

Buying a home that works for both seniors and young children can be complicated, if not impossible. When searching for a new home, itís important to keep in mind the special requirements for every member of your family both now, and as they continue to age.

Parents or other older relatives may need assistance getting upstairs or in and out of a tub. Even if they are fine now, aging is a tricky thing and mobility issues can crop up at any time. Planning for them now can save you money and stress in the future.

At the other end of the spectrum, child-proofing a home is important for small children or new infants, so keep an eye out for sharp edges and remember youíll have to bring strollers, high-chairs, car seats and more so plan for easy-to-open doors. Donít forget that as your kids get older, their needs will change as well: plan for privacy and personal space where you can to save on upgrading your home in the future.

For the best home search, make sure to let your real estate agent know who all will be living with you. He or she can assist in finding homes with the features you need and can provide advice about what things are feasible to change yourself, and what will make a house cost more than your budget in the long run.

Some important features to look for include:

  • ?Need help affording a home that meets all your needs? What if you just want to upgrade your existing home? Government agencies offer financial grants and assistance to retrofit your home for the elderly. Check with your agent to see what you might qualify for.
  • Ready to find the forever home for your entire family? We can help! Talk to your agent about the best way to search for your new home.
  • Wide Doorways: A door without a turning requirement (and those that open wider than a right angle) need to be at least 32 inches wide to ensure that wheelchairs and walkers will fit. Right angle doorways or those that require turning to enter or exit should be at least 36 inches wide.
  • Wide Hallways: For comfortable use by strollers, walkers, and wheelchairs, look for hallways that are at least 42 inches wide. That much space gives you the option of installing handrails on one or both sides. Handrails can help both small children learning to walk, and elderly people with mobility issues.

Thatís the easy part. The hardest room for both the very young and the elderly is the bathroom. Itís a good idea to ensure that your home has a minimum of 2 full bathrooms to allow you to accommodate the needs of all members of your family. Seniors need ADA toilets (also called comfort height) and grab bars, while your small child would need an extra-tall stool to use the taller toilet. Large showers with floor level entrances, seats and grab bars are best for the elderly, but its often easier to wash your kids in a tub, especially when theyíre young. With two bathrooms, you can satisfy the needs of everyone in the family.

Last, but not least, pay attention to faucets, handles, and knobs. Rounded ones can be difficult for both the old and young members of your family. Look for a single handle, lever and touchless options for the best results all around. Donít forget to test cabinets and drawers for weight or friction pull closers since those are more difficult than soft close or magnetic options. Itís okay if the home doesnít come pre-fitted with the knobs, handles, etc. you want, a quick trip to your local hardware store will solve it.

Need help affording a home that meets all your needs? What if you just want to upgrade your existing home? Government agencies offer financial grants and assistance to retrofit your home for the elderly. Check with your agent to see what you might qualify for.

Ready to find the forever home for your entire family? Talk to your agent about the best way to search for your new home.




Categories: Uncategorized