Titine Joyce - Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage - Scituate



Posted by Titine Joyce on 4/8/2021

Photo by Ferenc Keresi via Pixabay

Color can – and should – be used to decorate your home, but for most of us, too much bright color is more obnoxious than invigorating. Those screaming bright yellow walls may look amazing in the magazine spread, but you may not be prepared to live with that much color in your own space. Opting for colorful accents instead of going all in and painting a room a bright tangerine, violet or apple green can help you create an appealing space that is comfortable but not overwhelming.

5 Ways to Incorporate Bright Colors in your Home

Bright colors can be most appealing and impactful in smaller doses, according to HGTV. Learning how to incorporate them into your home without creating a chaotic and overwhelming space is key to using bold, lively shades in your décor.

Create an accent wall: A single wall painted with bold color or adorned with a bright, patterned wallpaper can become a focal point. It is also an inexpensive way to make a colorful statement without overwhelming your space or your bank account. Best of all, because you are only painting or covering a relatively small space, you can splurge on amazing paper or paint products.

Use textiles: You don’t have to buy brightly colored furniture to make a splash in your space. Use bright throws and accent pillows to liven up the room instead. These accents are easily swapped out if you decide you need a more traditional look and are easy to switch for different seasons or holidays, too.

Invest in art: A striking large canvas or mural can be an amazing focal point for your room and pull things together. Consider one large or several small pieces to light up your space and create an intriguing and appealing look for any room in your home.

Use rugs and flooring: Area rugs in a single bright color or with lots of color and texture can add a punch of color to any room, without overwhelming it. Use a rug to pull the room together with a new color you want to try, without committing to permanent changes.

Choose decorative accents: Home stores and sites abound, so if you want to test out a color, you’ve got many ways to do it. Choose your preferred color or palette then look for accent pieces from candles and picture frames to sculptural elements and tablescapes.

Before you commit to painting a wall or room, test out colors you think you like in smaller, more easily removed items, like the ones described above. This will help you determine your personal comfort level with bold colors and allow you to create a space that is uniquely yours.  




Tags: interior design   Decor   colors  
Categories: Uncategorized  


Posted by Titine Joyce on 4/1/2021

Photo by Nattanan Kanchanaprat via Pixabay

Would you like to invest in real estate? To buy thousands of income-producing properties, from apartments to office buildings to industrial parks, all over the country or the world? It you’re wealthy, you might dispatch someone to travel far and wide and do just that, but even if you’re not rich you can participate. The tool that enables this is a Real Estate Investment Trust, or REIT.

What is a REIT?

A REIT uses its investors’ money to buy or finance real estate that produces income. It’s an investment in property rather than stocks or bonds. The profit it earns from leases and rents is distributed to investors. By law REITs must pay out 90 percent of this income to the shareholders, but 100 percent is more common.

Most REITS are Equity REITs, which directly own property. Mortgage REITs are indirect, investing in mortgages and mortgage-backed securities. Most REITs are publicly traded and listed on national exchanges. Some are private; these generally require a larger minimum investment.

REIT holdings include residential buildings, office space, industrial facilities, shopping centers, hotels, storage facilities and even data centers. A REIT may invest in one of these asset types or a mix of many.

There are also mutual funds that invest in REITs. Some are actively managed and others are Exchange Traded Funds (ETFs) that buy all REITs, or all REITs in specific categories, without trying to pick winners.

Are REITs a good investment?

REITs offer the benefits of owning rental property without the headaches, homework and personal risk. If you want to buy, say, an apartment building, you must evaluate the property, arrange financing, find renters, deal with tenants and building maintenance on a day-to-day basis and handle the accounting and taxes. If your investment turns sour you’re in for a big loss. With REITs, professionals do that work, and if one property loses money it’s offset by those that do well. Also, you can put as much or as little at risk as you want in a REIT. You can buy a small number of shares for a few thousand or even a few hundred dollars.

Historically, REITs have outperformed most other investments long-term. Average returns for the last 10, 20, 30 and 40 years have been comfortably over 10%. However, REITs are subject to the ups and downs of real estate and can be a loser in the short run. Generally the best time to buy a REIT is when the real estate market is at the bottom as opposed to when it’s nearing a crest. Of course, it’s difficult to know exactly when that is, so dollar cost averaging, i.e., buying regularly over time, is a good strategy.

REITs tend not to move up and down in lockstep with stocks and bonds, so they can have a balancing effect in a portfolio. Few would recommend making REITs the major part of your holdings, but they can be an important component of your investment strategy.





Posted by Titine Joyce on 3/25/2021

Image by Have a Nice Day Photo from Shutterstock


The home you've been searching for is on the market, and now you’re ready to buy it. But can you afford it? How do you know? The internet is filled with mortgage calculators to help you determine what your mortgage payment will be. You simply plug in the numbers — the selling price, interest rate, down payment amount — and voila! Out pops your payment amount for the next 30 years.

Closing Costs

Your mortgage payment, with principal and interest, might tell you what to expect to pay the bank but multiple other factors add to the cost of homeownership. First, you'll have closing costs. Your real estate professional can give you an approximation of what these may be but the exact numbers won't be available until the closing is official. Closing costs include things like points and prepaid interest based on the day the loan closes.

Taxes

While you may know your tax costs for the first few months of homeownership, changes in levies, tax rates, and property evaluations can raise rates unexpectedly. If your home is in a developing community, costs of roads, streetlights, and other infrastructure get passed to homeowners in the form of special assessments, taxes, and fees.

Homeowner Association Fees

When your community has shared property such as playgrounds, pools, parks, and clubhouses, expect to pay monthly homeowner association (HOA) dues. These may come as a separate bill or be paid from an escrow account that your bank sets up. Like taxes, homeowner association dues and fees may raise each year to compensate for inflation or maintenance needs. If your HOA takes care of fences, roofs, and building exteriors, be prepared for periodic assessments. This may happen more frequently if your home is in a storm-prone area since wind and hail can cause considerable damage.

Periodic Maintenance

Whether you have an HOA or not, your home requires regular maintenance. When this is your first time as a property owner, you might not realize all the things covered in your rent. You'll have annual inspections to your heating and air conditioning systems, checks on your in-ground sprinklers, and pest control. You’re also responsible for attending to leaky faucets and running toilets, replacing the HVAC filters, replacing batteries in smoke detectors, and repairing anything that breaks.

When you’re ready to start shopping, your professional real estate agent can help you understand the costs as well as the advantages that come with homeownership in your area.





Posted by Titine Joyce on 3/18/2021

Photo by Robert Arthur Designs via Shutterstock

If you’re moving to a new city, particularly an area with new development, you may discover that most homes are part of a homeowner’s association. If you’ve never been part of one before, you might not understand their function and why they are useful within a neighborhood.

When an association functions properly, it improves the value of homes in the community. The rules and conditions keep your neighbors from infringing on your rights and vice versa.

Here’s a brief list of how your HOA benefits you:

  • It handles disputes between neighbors, so if your neighbor’s tree falls on your fence, the association mediates getting your fence repaired. Rules regarding approval for changes, renovations or upgrades to exteriors keep your neighbor from adding a second story that blocks your lake view or changing their exterior to a particularly obnoxious shade of orange.
  • It gives access to and maintains shared or common property. Typically, playgrounds, pools and parks fall into this category. In the case of condominiums and patio homes, the HOA often handles repairs to the exterior, roofs, elevators, garage doors and fences. Entry doors, hallways, and security also often fall under the jurisdiction of the association.
  • Many HOAs hire a property management service to take care of entry gates for a gated community, make agreements for waste removal and negotiate with the city regarding rezoning that might affect your home.
  • In some cases, HOAs handle the landscaping on the front of your home so that you only take care of your enclosed back yard or patio. For busy homeowners, this is quite an advantage. Other associations merely govern how long you can let your grass grow. This protects you from a negligent property owner that doesn’t take care of the house down the street.

While some of the rules may seem onerous, quizzing longtime residents can give insight into why one or another was added. A rule about basketball hoops in the driveway might make it seem as if they don’t want your kids playing out front. But perhaps the rule resulted from a freak windstorm that sent a freestanding basketball hoop across the street and through a neighbor’s window. Unless you ask, you don’t know.

Take time to attend your HOA meetings and become involved in the community. Even run for office and make your voice heard. If you have questions about living in an HOA community, your professional real estate agent can answer them.




Tags: buying   hoa  
Categories: Uncategorized  


Posted by Titine Joyce on 3/11/2021

When you’re buying or selling a home, you may hear the terms, “assessed value” and “market value.” There are few things that you should know about these terms. First, they cannot be used interchangeably. The assessed value is generally much less than the market value. If you’re buying a home, you probably would rather see the assessed value of the home as a price! If you’re selling, the same holds true for the market value of the home for you.


Market Value Is Used Differently Than Assessed Value


The market value is how much your home is worth on the market currently. The definition is exactly as the term sounds the home is looked at by an assessor and given a value. The assessed value is used to determine property taxes, among other things. As you can imagine, the assessed value can become a point of contention for many homeowners especially when it comes to paying their tax bills. Many homes end up being assessed at a higher price than their current value, bringing tax bills to higher levels. The market value is what the home will sell for when it is listed for sale.


Be careful when searching for a home to buy. Many sites list the assessed value along with the price of the home or estimated market value of the home. You don’t want to get these numbers confused when budgeting and searching for the perfect house. 


If you’re getting ready to sell your home, pay little attention to the assessed value of the home. That is not what your home will sell for. 


The market value is a good reason to hire a realtor to help you sell your home. Realtors are experts in finding the market values of homes. They will even do something called a CMA (comparative market analysis) for you to help you determine the right price for your home to sell at. This is where comparable properties in the area are examined for their selling prices and all the perks of your home and neighborhood are considered. The market value is determined by the price of the homes that have recently been sold in the area based on the location of the home and how close it is to certain amenities like schools, parks, and the probability of future construction. 


Finally, know that the market value and the appraised value of a home have a lot to do with how much a lender will give you to buy the property. Every home that is being bought must go through an appraisal, to protect the lender from overpaying for a home.    


Whether you’re buying or selling a home, knowing your value terms can really be a help in understanding the sweet spot for pricing a property  





Categories: Uncategorized